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Factsheets & other resources

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Managing powdery mildew

  • Date: 2010-03-01
  • Author: Magarey, Peter A.

Powdery mildew is driven by the amount of inoculum (spores) inherited from last season. In much of Australian viticulture, the disease progresses more or less independent of the weather, though in cool climates, temperature may be limiting at times.  Powdery mildew is common across Australian vineyards. With a better knowledge of disease epidemiology (ie how the disease spreads), of the need to time sprays appropriately and, with improved spray technology and an excellent array of fungicides, direct crop loss from powdery is minimal.

Managing downy mildew

  • Date: 2010-03-01
  • Author: Magarey, Peter A.

Downy mildew is driven by the weather. The disease can devastate individual vineyards and in some seasons, affect production from regions.

National phylloxera management protocol

  • Date: 2009-10-01
  • Author: National Vine Health Steering Committee

The National Phylloxera Management Protocol has been developed by the National Vine Health Steering Committee (NVHSC) to reduce the risk of spread of grapevine phylloxera. The National Protocol provides a consistent, technically justified framework for the movement of grapevines and grapevine material or associated potentially contaminated items between grapegrowing regions of different phylloxera status.

A sampling method for nematode monitoring

  • Date: 2006-01-01
  • Author: Cooperative Research Centre for Viticulture

Nematodes, also known as eelworms, are mostly microscopic in size and have translucent, slender wormlike bodies that taper toward the head and tail. They are hard to see with the naked eye, but can be extracted from the soil using specialised techniques. Plant-parasitic nematodes feed on plant roots and can decrease vine productivity. Therefore, it is important that nematode population pressure is assessed pre-planting, and when management inadvertently promotes the lifecycle of nematodes.

The analysis of soil samples for nematodes has to be carried out in a specialist laboratory. The information below suggests general guidelines for collecting nematode samples.

Nematodes in Australian vineyard soils

  • Date: 2006-01-01
  • Author: Cooperative Research Centre for Viticulture

Nematodes are microscopic roundworms. Some species have become parasitic pests of grapevines in Australia. Although they are diffi cult to detect and there is no clear solution to the problem of nematode infestations, routine monitoring and careful consideration of vineyard practices – especially when planting new vines – can help reduce yield losses.

Botryosphaeria canker and bunch rot

  • Date: 2005-01-01
  • Author: Cooperative Research Centre for Viticulture

Botryosphaeria spp. are found in most grape growing regions of Australia. The fungus is known to infect a wide range of hosts including native Acacia and Eucalyptus trees and shrubs, and members of the protea family.

Bud mite

  • Date: 2005-01-01
  • Author: Cooperative Research Centre for Viticulture

Bud mite (and blister mite) are two strains of a mite species which only occurs on grapevines. They are essentially identical except for the damage they cause by their feeding activities – bud mite feed on and damage young buds, and blister mite cause galling on leaves . The information in this Vitinote focuses on bud mite.

Characteristics of rust mite

  • Date: 2005-01-01
  • Author: Cooperative Research Centre for Viticulture

Grapevine rust mite is found in most grape growing areas but is often not a problem unless the overuse of chemicals affects populations of predatory mites and insects. It causes damage to leaves and bunch stems.

Spring control of rust mite

  • Date: 2005-01-01
  • Author: Cooperative Research Centre for Viticulture

If rust mite activity was observed in the vineyard in the previous season, particularly significant leaf bronzing in the late summer/autumn, control measures for rust mite are likely to be required before budburst in the upcoming season.

Recent research indicates that control of rust mite can only be achieved in a very narrow window in early spring when the mites are exposed during migration from their winter sheltering sites, before leaf expansion provides them with shelter from sprays and before they can lay their eggs.

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