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Factsheets & other resources

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Bunch exposure management

  • Date: 2009-09-01
  • Author: Dry, Peter

Bunch overexposure causes losses in both productivity and wine quality. Excessive bunch exposure is detrimental to wine quality in warm to hot and sunny climates.

Defining berry ripeness

  • Date: 2005-01-01
  • Author: Cooperative Research Centre for Viticulture

Generally, bunches of grapes do not ripen to maturity if they are removed from the vine before veraison, although some ripening processes do occur before any visible signs of veraison. There are several ways to define ripeness in grapevines, all of which are used in modern viticulture.

Site factors influencing berry ripening processes and rates of ripening

  • Date: 2005-01-01
  • Author: Cooperative Research Centre for Viticulture

On the same site, with identical management practices, different grapevine varieties generally ripen at different rates. This is due to the genetically determined behaviours of the grape varieties, in combination with their interaction with the site. Good varietal selection is important if crucial stages of development are to occur in favorable conditions.

Uneven ripening

  • Date: 2005-01-01
  • Author: Cooperative Research Centre for Viticulture

Grapes that are evenly ripened, sound at the time of harvest and cool at delivery are in an ideal condition for winemaking. Uneven ripening can present as bunches that contain small hard berries that remain green while other berries ripen. Bunches may have poor or uneven colouring.

Dormancy and budburst

  • Date: 2005-01-01
  • Author: Cooperative Research Centre for Viticulture

Grapevines developed to survive harsh winters by losing their leaves and shutting down their metabolic processes. Dormancy is therefore the winter survival behaviour of vines grown in temperate areas.

Restricted spring growth syndrome (RSG)

  • Date: 2005-01-01
  • Author: Cooperative Research Centre for Viticulture

Restricted Spring Growth (RSG) is a condition seenin some vines in spring. It is caused by a range of factors and is not a disease in itself. Symptoms can vary between vines, from site to site and between years depending on the factors impacting on the specific vines, but generally vines affected by the condition exhibit poor growth early in the season.

Spring shoot and root growth

  • Date: 2005-01-01
  • Author: Cooperative Research Centre for Viticulture

Understanding grapevine shoot and root growth.